Civil War Campaign Medal
Display Recognition

Site Index

      • Example Display Recognition
      • Display Types
      • Issue Requirements
      • Issue Regulations, Army
      • Issue Regulations, Navy
      • Administration Processing and Delivery
      • How To Apply For This Display Recognition and/or Medal
      • Mailing Address
      • Questions?
      • Other Display Recognitions
      • Civil War Websites
      • Civil War Discussion Group
      • Example Display Recognition:
        Actual Size: 8 1/2 x 11
        Displayed: Army.



        Who May Apply

        • Family Members of Civil War recipients who served from the following states (*)
        • Estate Inheritors of Civil War recipients who served from the following states
        • (*)

          (*) California, Connecticuty, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin

          Applicants for Civil War soldiers and sailors who served from the following states, Click Here: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, south Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, Virginia

        Display Types

        You have four display types to choose from:
        Black & White (No Color)
        Heavy Bond Enclosure

        Heavy Bond Enclosure
        Colors: Regal, Black, Navy
        Trimmed in Appearance Gold

        Ready for Mantle or Shelf Display

        Issue Requirements


        Almost every Civil War soldier and sailor is listed on The American War Library. However, if we find that the Civil War soldier or sailor is for some reason NOT listed by The War Library you may be asked to submit proof of service. At this time submit your ancestor's Application Form. We will notify you shortly if any additional documentation is needed:

        NOTICE

        This Display Recognition is available ONLY to authorized recipients who possess orders, or authorization form, or release documentation that confirms award eligibility. (See "Issue Requirements"). To obtain either a Display Medal or a Display Recognition for your authorized award you will be required to provide military-issued documentation authorizing your award. There are no exceptions.

        WARNING!
        You must NOT submit a military issued document or photocopy that:

        • has been altered in any way by you after
          the original's official issue
        • contains information or corrections or
          additions that you entered
        • lists awards or training you knowingly did not receive
        • contains highlighting, colorizing or other markings you entered

        Be advised that on request any knowingly fraudulent document sent by you will be released to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) that may result in prosecution and/or fine/imprisonment.

        Email Questions, or Phone: 310-532-0634

        Personnel Branch
        Processing and Delivery

        Style Admin Shipping Total
        Full Color .PDF (Printable) $7.50 Emailed $7.50
        Published Document only (Full Color) $14.00 $7.15 $21.15
        Published Document in Heavy Bond Enclosure (Full Color) $19.00 $7.15 $26.15
        Full Color Printable Certificates
        on CD-Rom (minimum 20 Certificates)
        $7.50 $7.50 By Count

      • Total/Shipping fees, above, apply to 50 U.S. states
      • Contact The War Library for international shipping cost
      • How To Apply

        You may apply for your Display Recognition using a...

      • Check Debit card (* Shipped within 1 week)
      • Charge card (* Shipped within 1 week)
      • Personal, Business, Bank or Cashiers Check ( Shipped in 6 weeks)
      • Money Order (* Shipped within 1 week)
      • (* Upon reception of required documentation)

        Please complete and MAIL the APPLICATION FORM.

        Mailing Address

        Records Chief (REC-AMW)
        The American War Library
        16907 Brighton Avenue
        Gardena CA 90247-5420

        Questions?

        Click here for answers to common questions

        Email: Recognition Inquiry

        Telephone: 1-310-532-0634

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        Issue Regulations
        Civil War Medal


        This Certificate may be free to some requesters. Click for larger image

        Establishing Authority, Army

        The Army Civil War Campaign Medal was established on January 21, 1907, by War Department General Orders Number 12 for issue to those who served with Union forces.

        Effective Dates

        This medal was awarded for qualifying service between the inclusive dates of April 15, 1861, and April 9, 1865 (extended to August 20, 1866 for service in Texas).

        Criteria

        Awarded for military service between April 15, 1861 and April 9, 1865; or in Texas, to August 20, 1866.

        Order of Precedence

        The Civil War is the earliest military service recognized by a campaign medal; therefore, this medal is worn before all other Army campaign medals.

        Devices

        The only device authorized for the Civil War Campaign Medal was the Silver Citation star, a five-pointed star three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter. When authorized for gallantry in action during the Civil War, the Silver Citation Star could be worn on the ribbon of the Civil War Campaign Medal. Only six Silver Citation Stars were retroactively authorized for gallantry in action during the Civil War. They were awarded to the following individuals:

        Conn, Charles G., 1Lt, Michigan Volunteer Infantry Goldthwait, George F., 1st Sgt., 31st Maine Infantry Harris, William T., Private, 179th New York Volunteer Infantry Kress, John A., Lt Col, 94th New York Volunteer Infantry Wheeler, Alar M., Capt., 21st New York Volunteer Infantry Willi, William, Bugler, Missouri Volunteer Infantry

        Designer and Sculptor

        The Civil War Campaign Medal was designed by Francis D. Millet (1846-1912).

        First Recipient

        Civil War Campaign Medal No. 1 was issued to Major General Charles F. Humphrey on May 26, 1909.

        Description and Symbolism

        Obverse

        In the center of a bronze medallion one and a quarter inches in diameter, the head of Lincoln surrounded by the raised inscription, WITH MALICE TOWARD NONE WITH CHARITY FOR ALL.

        According to Millet, "The head of Lincoln was selected because it is the only thing which can be used on the medal without offense to the sentiment now happily prevailing over the whole country in regard to the Civil War, and the portrait of Lincoln must be acceptable to everybody, particularly when accompanied by the noble phrase which so tersely and accurately expresses his attitude during the war."

        Reverse

        In the center of a bronze medallion one and a quarter inches in diameter, the words THE CIVIL WAR over a bar, under which appears the dates 1862-1865; the central theme is surrounded by a wreath composed of a branch of oak on the left and laurel on the right, joined at the base by a bow. The oak represents the strength of the Union and the laurel represents victory.

        Ribbon

        This medal has had two ribbons. The first was used from January 11, 1905, to August 12, 1913. It consisted of two sets of red, white and blue stripes of equal width, separated in the center by a white stripe (the blue stripe forming the outermost edge of the ribbon). These colors were selected because they represent the national colors. The second ribbon consisted of equal widths of blue and gray, representing the two sides of the conflict: the Union (blue) and the Confederacy (gray).

        Numbering

        The medal was initially manufactured by the Philadelphia Mint and was serially numbered with an No. Later strikes were numbered with the M.No. prefix. Subsequent strikes were made by various manufacturers and were numbered without prefix.

        1. Description: A bronze medal, 1 < inches in diameter, with the head of Lincoln, nearly in profile, facing sinister, surrounded by the words "WITH MALICE TOWARD NONE WITH CHARITY FOR ALL". On the reverse are the words "THE CIVIL WAR" and below this are the dates "1861-1865", surrounded by a wreath formed by a branch of oak on the left and a branch of olive on the right with the stems joined at the bottom by a conventional knot.

        2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and equally divided with 11/16 inch Navy blue #1 67179 and 11/16 inch gray 67200.

        3. Criteria: Service between 15 April 1861 and 9 April 1865, or in Texas between 15 April 1861 and 20 August 1866.

        4. Components: The following are authorized components and related items:

        a. Medal (regular size): MIL-DTL-3943/190. Not currently available in the supply system.

        b. Ribbon: MIL-DTL-11589/25. Available commercially.

        c. Streamer: MIL-DTL-11589/25 and MIL-DTL-14650. The gray portion of the streamer is on top for organizations with Confederate service and the blue portion is on top for organizations with Union service.

        5. Background: a. The concept of campaign medals for the Army was first approved by the Assistant Secretary of War and announced in General Orders 4, War Department, dated 11 January 1905 which states "by authority of the President, campaign badges with ribbons will be issued as articles of the uniform to officers and enlisted men in the service to honor services which have been or shall hereafter be rendered in campaigns". This order further states that "announcement will be made by the War Department designating campaigns for which will be issued and defining the conditions of the award". The subject of campaign medals was considered; however, the Judge Advocate General of the Army, in his opinion, concluded it was not proper to issue "medals" except by authority of Congress, but it was proper for the President to authorize the issue of "badges" as part of the uniform.

        b. The first badges authorized under the above order were the Spanish Campaign Badge, Philippine Campaign Badge, and the China Campaign Badge by General Orders 5, War Department, dated 12 January 1905. General Orders 12, War Department, dated 21 January 1907 amended General Orders 5, 12 January 1905, to include authorization for the Civil War Campaign Badge and Indian Campaign Badge. The General Order also stated "Under existing law these badges can only be issued to persons who are now in the military service of the United States or who may enter the service hereafter. Eligibility was extended to those on the retired list by General Orders 129, War Department, dated 13 August 1908, and in case the retired member was deceased, claims by proper legal representatives of such personnel were honored.

        c. The Civil War Campaign Badge was design by Mr. F. D. Millett, a prominent American Artist, and the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, approved the design and authorized the manufacture of the badge in 1906. The initial contract with a commercial firm was canceled and the design turned over to the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia for manufacture. The initial ribbon design was two bands of red, white, and blue with the red on the outside and the blue bands separated by a thin white stripe in the center. The head of Lincoln was selected because it was the only thing that could be used on the medal without offense to the sentiment then happily prevailing over the whole country in regard to the Civil War. The portrait of Lincoln must be acceptable to everybody, particularly when accompanied by the noble phrase from the Second Inaugural speech which so tersely and accurately expresses his attitude during the war. The ribbon was changed in 1913 to half blue (on the left) and half gray.

        d. Because of the desire to provide the medal to individuals no longer in the service, Major General Leonard Wood, Chief of Staff, in a letter to the Director of the U.S. Mint on 30 June 1913 requested the U.S. Mint sell the campaign badges to persons who were no longer in the service.

        e. AR 600-65, dated 20 November 1928, refers to the Civil War Campaign Medal rather than badge. Subsequent correspondence and regulations refer to medal rather than badge.

        f. Section 33, Act of Congress, 10 August 1956, (10 USC 3751) requires the Secretary of the Army to procure and issue without charge, the Civil War Campaign Medal and other service medals. This law also provides that the medal will be presented to the members family if the member dies before it is presented to him.

        g. The streamers for display on the organizational flags will have the inscription as shown on the unit's lineage and honors. The 25 Civil War streamers displayed on the Army flag will have the inscriptions as shown in AR 840-10 and AR 600-8-22

        Established by the War Department on 11 January 1905, for those personnel who served in the Union forces during the Civil War.

        Medal Designed by Francis D. Millet Photos are of a contemporary medal re-struck from original dies.

        Campaigns for which awarded:

        Sumter 12-13 Apr 1861
        Bull Run: 16-22 Jul 1861
        Henry & Donelson: 6-16 Feb 1862
        Mississippi River: 6 Feb 1862 - 9 Jul 1863
        Peninsula: 17 Mar - 3 Aug 1862
        Shiloh: 6-7 Apr 1862
        Valley: 15 May - 17 Jun 1862
        Manassas: 1 Aug - 2 Sep 1862
        Antietam: 3-17 Sep 1862
        Fredericksburd: 9 Nov - 15 Dec 1862
        Murfreesborough: 26 Dec 1862 - 4 Jan 1863
        Chancellorsville: 27 Apr - 6 May 1863
        Gettysburd: 29 Jun - 3 Jul 1863
        Vicksburd: 29 Mar - 4 Jul 1863
        Chickamauga: 16 Aug - 22 Sep 1863
        Wilderness: 4-7 May 1864
        Atlanta: 7 May - 2 Sep 1864
        Spotsylvania: 8-21 May 1864
        Cold Harbor: 22 May - 3 Jun 1864
        Petersburd: 4 Jun 1864 - 2 Apr 1865
        Shenandoah: 7 Aug - 28 Nov 1864
        Franklin: 17-30 Nov 1864
        Nashville: 1-16 Dec 1864
        Appomattox: 3-9 Apr 1865

        Issue Regulations, Navy

        Establishing Authority

        The Navy Civil War Medal was established on June 27, 1908, by Navy Department Special Orders Number 81 for the Navy, and by Navy Department Special Orders Number 82 for the Marine Corps.

        Effective Dates

        The Navy Civil War Medal was awarded for qualifying service between the inclusive dates of April 15, 1861, and April 9, 1865.

        Criteria

        The Navy Civil War Medal was awarded for qualifying active service in the Navy or Marine Corps between the inclusive dates of April 15, 1861, and April 9, 1865.

        Order of Precedence

        The Civil War is the earliest military service recognized by a Navy campaign medal; therefore, this medal is worn before all other Navy campaign medals.

        Devices

        No devices were established for the Navy Civil War Medal

        Designer

        The Navy Civil War Medal was designed by Rudolf Freund (1878-1960) of Bailey, Banks & Biddle.

        First Recipient

        Navy Civil War medal #1 was issued to Admiral George Dewey, and Marine Corps Civil War Medal #1 was issued to Quartermaster Sergeant Artimus F. George.

        Description and Symbolism

        Obverse

        In the center of a bronze medallion one and a quarter inches in diameter, two ironclad naval vessels are shown engaged in combat. To the rear of both ships (and to the viewer's right), two wooden vessels appear, one of which is sinking. In the sky, a bomb is bursting in air. Above this scene, and following the upper contour of the medal, the words THE CIVIL WAR appear in raised letters. The exergue contains the dates 1861-1865.

        The battle scene is a representation of the fight between the ironclads Monitor and Merrimac at Hampton Roads, Virginia on March 9, 1862. The Monitor in the right foreground closes with the Merrimac at left center. In the background, to the right, are two wooden ships one of which is sinking. In a sense, this scene also marks the end of the old (wooden) Navy and emergence of the new, modern Navy. The inscription and dates denote the conflict and the period during which it was fought.

        Reverse

        In the center of a bronze medallion, an eagle with its wings displayed is shown resting upon an anchor with draped chain, over the words FOR SERVICE in raised letters. At the base of the medal, and following the contour of its rim, there is an elongated wreath composed of oak on the left and laurel on the right. Following the contour of the upper portion of the medal, the words UNITED STATES NAVY (or UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS) are shown in raised letters.

        The eagle is the American bald eagle and represents the United States. The anchor and draped chain allude to naval service. oak represents strength and laurel represents victory.

        Ribbon

        The ribbon consists of equal parts blue and gray. These colors represent the two sides in the conflict: the Union (blue) and Confederacy (gray).

        Numbering

        This medal was originally manufactured by Bailey, Banks and Biddle of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was serially numbered without prefix on the rim at the 6:00 o'clock position.

        Civil War Medal

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