Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal
Display Recognition

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      • Example Display Recognition
      • Applicable Military Branches
      • Display Types
      • Issue Requirements
      • Issue Regulations
      • Who May Apply
      • Executive Order 9265
      • Administration Processing and Delivery
      • How To Apply For This Display Recognition and/or Medal
      • Mailing Address
      • Questions?
      • Other Display Recognitions
      • World War II Websites
      • Example Display Recognition:
        Actual Size: 8 1/2 x 11



        Military Branches

        All Military Service branches are applicable:
        Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Navy

        Who May Apply

        • Veteran recipients
        • Active Duty recipients
        • Family Members of recipients
        • Estate Inheritors

        Display Types

        You have four display types to choose from:
        Black & White (No Color)
        Heavy Bond Enclosure

        Heavy Bond Enclosure
        Colors: Regal, Black, Navy
        Trimmed in Appearance Gold

        Ready for Mantle or Shelf Display

        Issue Requirements
        You must submit the following:

      • An unaltered photocopy of your WD AGO 53-55 or other military issued document clearly displaying your award of the Asiatic Pacific Campaign.
      • Contact The War Library if you do not have a WD AGO 53-55: 1-562-422-4100.
      • NOTICE

        This Display Recognition is available ONLY to authorized recipients who possess orders, or authorization form, or release documentation that confirms award eligibility. (See "Issue Requirements"). To obtain either a Display Medal or a Display Recognition for your authorized award you will be required to provide military-issued documentation authorizing your award. There are no exceptions.

        WARNING!
        You must NOT submit a military issued document or photocopy that:

        • has been altered in any way by you after
          the original's official issue
        • contains information or corrections or
          additions that you entered
        • lists awards or training you knowingly did not receive
        • contains highlighting, colorizing or other markings you entered

        Be advised that on request any knowingly fraudulent document sent by you will be released to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) that may result in prosecution and/or fine/imprisonment.

        Email Questions, or Phone / Fax: 1-562-422-4100

        Personnel Branch
        Processing and Delivery

        Style Admin Shipping Total
        Full Color .PDF (Printable) $7.50 Emailed $7.50
        Published Document only (Full Color) $14.00 $8.35 $22.35
        Published Document in Heavy Bond Enclosure (Full Color) $19.00 $8.35 $27.35
        Full Color Printable Certificates
        on CD-Rom (minimum 20 Certificates)
        $7.50 $7.50 By Count

      • Total/Shipping fees, above, apply to 50 U.S. states
      • Contact The War Library for international shipping cost
      • How to Apply

        You may apply for your Display Recognition using a...

      • Check Debit card (* Shipped within 1 week)
      • Charge card (* Shipped within 1 week)
      • Personal, Business, Bank or Cashiers Check ( Shipped in 6 weeks)
      • Money Order (* Shipped within 1 week)
      • (* Upon reception of required documentation)

        Complete and MAIL this APPLICATION FORM.
        Don't forget to include an unaltered COPY of your WD AGO 53-55 or other pre-arranged document(s).

        DISPLAY RECOGNITION and/or MEDAL APPLICATION FORM

        Mailing Address

        Records Chief (REC-AMW)
        The American War Library
        817 East Via Carmelitos Ste 319
        Long Beach CA 90805-7549

        Questions?

        Click here for answers to common questions

        Email: Asia-Pacific Medal Display Recognition Inquiry

        Telephone: 1-562-422-4100

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        Issue Regulations


        Asiatic Pacific Campaign

        Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal

        Click for larger image

        Establishing Authority

        The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was established by Executive Order 9265 signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on November 6, 1942, and implemented by War Department Bulletin 56 (1942) and Navy Department General Orders Number 253 (1942).

        Effective Dates

        The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for qualifying service between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946.

        Criteria

        The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for for qualifying service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, under any of the following conditions:

        -- On permanent assignment within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater; or,

        -- For service in a passenger status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 non-consecutive days; or,

        -- For service in active combat in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations against the enemy and awarded a combat decoration or furnished a recognition by the commanding general of a corps, higher unit, or independent force that the individual actually participated in combat.

        Order of Precedence

        The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was worn after the American Campaign Medal and before the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.

        Devices

        A. Bronze service stars

        Bronze service stars were awarded by all services for participation in designated campaigns.

        B. Bronze arrowhead

        A bronze arrowhead device was awarded for participation in designated Army amphibious and airborne combat assaults (Note: only one bronze arrowhead could be worn on the ribbon).

        Designer

        The obverse of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was designed by Thomas Hudson Jones (1892-1969). The reverse was designed by Adolph A. Weinman (1870-1952).

        First Recipient

        The first recipient of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was General Douglas MacArthur, who was presented his medal on December 17, 1947.

        Description and Symbolism

        Obverse

        In the center of a bronze medallion one and a quarter inches in diameter, the medal depicts a tropical landing scene with a battleship, aircraft carrier, submarine and aircraft in the background with landing troops and palm trees in the foreground. Above this scene, and following the contour of the medal, are the words ASIATIC-PACIFIC CAMPAIGN.

        The invasion scene represents the numerous island operations of the war in the Pacific. The figures represent the Army (soldiers) and Marine Corps (Marines) while the ships in the background represent the Navy and the aircraft represent the Army Air Corps.

        Reverse

        In the center of a bronze medallion one and a quarter inches in diameter, an American bald eagle is shown perched on a rock. To the eagle's left, the dates 1941-1945 (in two lines); to the eagle's right, the words UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (in three lines).

        The bald eagle is the national symbol and thereby represents the American people. It is perched on a solid rock which represents the firmness of resolve and strength of America in prosecuting the war, as indicated by the dates.

        Ribbon

        The ribbon to the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign medal consists of a yellow background bisected by blue, white and red pinstripes. Inside the outer edges of the ribbon there is another set of somewhat wider pinstripes, these being white, red, and white. The Secretary of War directed that ribbons for the area campaign medals were to employ Separate colors to denote the theaters they represented. The theater color was to predominate in each ribbon and the common relationship among all of them was to be achieved by using colored stripes put in the same place on each of the ribbons.

        The predominant yellow in the background represents the sands of the islands in the Pacific, where many of the major engagements were fought; the blue, white and red pinstripes in the center are taken from the American Defense Service Medal and represent the national colors. The white-red-white stripes inside each edge of the ribbon are the colors of the empire of Japan and represent the enemy in the Pacific during the Second World War.

        The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was authorized Nov. 6, 1942, by Executive Order No. 9265 signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The medal was issued to commemorate the service performed by personnel of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard who served during the periods and in the areas designated below.

        Effective March 15, 1946, members serving in the geographical area between Dec. 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946 (dates inclusive) are authorized award of the medal.

        The geographical definitions of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Area is: East boundary -- From the North Pole, south along the 141st meridian west longitude to the east boundary of Alaska, thence south and southeast along the Alaskan boundary to the Pacific Ocean. thence south along the 130th meridian to its intersection with the 30th parallel north latitude, thence southeast to the intersection of the equator and the 100th meridian west longitude, thence south along the 100th meridian west longitude to the South Pole.West boundary -- From the North Pole, south along the 60th meridian east longitude to its intersection with the eastern border of Iran, thence south along that border to the Gulf of Oman and the intersection of the 60th meridian east longitude, thence south along the 60th meridian east longitude to the South Pole.

        A Bronze Service Star denotes subsequent awards for periods of service or campaigns in the Korean theater of operations. A Silver Service Star is worn in lieu of 5 Bronze Service Stars.

        (Army/Air Force) Bronze Arrowhead device denotes participation in parachute, glider or amphibious landing or assault.

        (Navy) Marine Corps Device denotes combat service with Marine Corps units.

        The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was designed by the Army's Institute of Heraldry. The medal is a circular bronze disc showing troop landing in a tropical setting with a palm tree. battleship, aircraft carrier and submarine in the background. At the top of the medal, around the edge, are the words ASIATIC PACIFIC CAMPAIGN. The reverse of the medal shows an American eagle standing on a rock. On the left of the eagle are the raised inscribed dates 1941-1945 and on the right UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. The ribbon is yellow-orange with narrow center stripes of red, white and blue (United States). Near the edges are narrow white, red and white stripes (Japan). Participation is specific combat operations is denoted by three-sixteenth inch bronze stars. A three-sixteenth inch silver star is worn in lieu of five bronze stars.

        The forty-two Marine Corps campaign designations for the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal are:

        Aleutians Operations, 1943
        Asiatic-Pacific Raids, 1944
        Bismarck Archipelago, 1943-1944
        Bomeo Operation, 1945
        Buin-Faisi-Tonolai, 1942
        Cape Experience (Second Savo), 1942
        Capture and Defense of Gaudalcanal, 1942-1943
        Capture and Occupation of Tinian, 1944
        Consolidation of Southern Philippines, 1945
        Coral Sea, 1942
        Eastern New Guinea, 1942-1944
        Eastern Solomons (Stewart Isl.), 1942
        Gaudalcanal,-Tulagi Landings, 1942
        Gilbert Island Operation, 1943
        Guadalcanal (Third Savo), 1942
        Hollandia Operation, 1944
        Iwo Jima Operation, 1945
        Kurile Islands Operation, 1944-1945
        Leyte Operation, 1944
        Luzon Operation, 1944-1945
        Makin Raid, 1942
        Manila Bay-Bicol Operation, 1945
        Marianas Operation
        Marshall Islands Operation, 1943-1944
        Midway, 1942
        Naval Group China, 1943-1945
        Netherlands East Indies, 1941-1942
        New Georgia Group Operation, 1943
        Okinawa Gunto Operation, 1945
        Pacific Raids, 1942
        Pacific Raids, 1943
        Pearl Harbor-Midway, 1941
        Philippine Islands Operation, 1941-1942
        Rennel Island Operation, 1943
        Santa Cruz Islands, 1942
        Solomon Islands Consolidation, 1943-1945
        Tassafaronga (Fourth Savo), 1942
        Third Fleet Operations against Japan, 1945
        Treasury-Bougainvillea Operation, 1943
        Wake Island, 1941
        Western Caroline Islands, 1944
        Western New Guinea, 1944-1945

        1. Description: The bronze medal is 1-1/4 inches in width. On the obverse is a tropical landing scene with a battleship, aircraft carrier, submarine and an aircraft in the background with landing troops and palm trees in the foreground with the words "ASIATIC PACIFIC CAMPAIGN" above the scene. On the reverse, an American bald eagle close between the dates "1941 - 1945" and the words "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA".

        2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 3/16 inch yellow 67108; 1/16 inch white 67101; 1/16 inch scarlet 67111; 1/16 inch white; < inch yellow; center 1/8 triparted old glory blue 67178, white and scarlet; < inch yellow; 1/16 inch white; 1/16 inch scarlet; 1/16 inch white; and 3/16 inch yellow.

        3. Criteria: a. The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded to personnel for service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater between 7 December 1941 and 2 March 1946 under any of the following conditions:

        (1) On permanent assignment.

        (2) In a passenger status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 days not consecutive.

        (3) In active combat against the enemy and was awarded a combat decoration or furnished a recognition by the commanding general of a corps, higher unit, or independent force that he actually participated in combat.

        b. The eastern boundary of the Asiatic-Pacific Theater is from the North Pole, south along the 141st meridian west longitude to the east boundary of Alaska, then south and southeast along the Alaska boundary to the Pacific Ocean, then south along the 130th meridian to its intersection with the 30th parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator and the 100th meridian west longitude, then to the South Pole. The western boundary of the Asiatic-Pacific Theater is from the North Pole south along the 60th meridian east longitude to its intersection with the east boundary of Iran, then south along the Iran boundary to the Gulf of Oman and the intersection of the 60th meridian east longitude, then south along the 60th meridian east longitude to the South Pole. The Asiatic-Pacific Theater included Alaska, Hawaii, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, and all of Asia.

        4. Components: The following are authorized components:

        a. Medal (regular size): MIL-DTL-3943/247. Medal set with full size medal and ribbon bar. NSN 8455-00-269-5764.

        b. Medal (miniature): MIL-DTL-3943/247. Available commercially.

        c. Ribbon: MIL-DTL-11589/17. NSN 8455-00-257-0525. Available commercially.

        d. Streamer: The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign ribbon is used as a streamer for 21 streamers on the Army flag. Units that received campaign credit display the streamers with the inscription as listed on their lineage and honors.

        5. Background: a. The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was established per Executive Order 9265, dated 6 November 1942, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and announced in War Department Bulletin 56, 1942. The criteria was initially announced in Department of the Army (DA) Circular 1, dated 1 January 1943, so that the ribbon could be authorized prior to design of the medal. The criteria for the medal was announced in DA Circular 84, dated 25 March 1948, and subsequently published in Army Regulation 600-65, dated 22 September 1948.

        b. The ribbon design was approved by the Secretary of War on 24 November 1942. The yellow ribbon has white and red on each side to represent the Japanese colors. The center blue, white, and red stripes are taken from the American Defense Service Medal ribbon and refers to the continuance of American Defense after Pearl Harbor.

        c. The medal was designed by Mr. Thomas Hudson Jones. The reverse side was designed by Mr. A. A. Weinman and is the same design as used on the reverse of the European-African-Middle Eastern and American Campaign Medals. The medal design was submitted to the Commission of Fine Arts on 22 May 1947 and the first medal was presented to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur on 17 December 1947.

        d. A bronze star is worn on the ribbon to indicate participation in designated campaigns. The designated campaigns for the Asiatic-Pacific Theater and inscriptions used on the Army Flag streamer set are:

        Philippine Island 7 Dec 41 - 10 May 42
        Burma, 1942 7 Dec 41 - 26 May 42
        Central Pacific 7 Dec 41 - 6 Dec 43
        East Indies 1 Jan 42 - 22 Jul 42
        India-Burma 2 Apr 42 - 28 Jan 45
        Air Offensive, Japan 17 Apr 42 - 2 Sep 45
        Aleutian Islands 3 Jun 42 - 24 Aug 43
        China Defensive 4 Jul 42 - 4 May 45
        Papua 23 Jul 42 - 23 Jan 43
        Guadalcanal 7 Aug 42 - 21 Feb 43
        New Guinea 24 Jan 43 - 31 Dec 44
        Northern Solomons 22 Feb 43 - 21 Nov 44
        Eastern Mandates 7 Dec 43 - 14 Jun 44
        Bismarck Archipelago 15 Dec 43 - 27 Nov 44
        Western Pacific 17 Apr 44 - 2 Sep 45
        Lyete 17 Oct 44 - 1 Jul 45
        Luzon 15 Dec 44 - 4 Jul 45
        Central Burma 29 Jan 45 - 15 Jul 45
        Southern Philippines 27 Feb 45 - 4 Jul 45
        Ryukyus 26 Mar 45 - 2 Jul 45
        China Offensive 5 May 45 - 2 Sep 45
        * Antisubmarine 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45
        * Ground Combat: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45
        * Air Combat: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45

        * These campaigns are not displayed as streamers on the Army flag.

        e. A bronze arrowhead is worn on the ribbon to indicate participation in a combat parachute jump, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater.


        Executive Order 9265--American, European-African-Middle Eastern and Asiatic-Pacific campaign medals

        Source: The provisions of Executive Order 9265 of Nov. 6, 1942, appear at 7 FR 9106, 3 CFR, 1938-1943 Comp., p. 1224, unless otherwise noted.

        By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, it is hereby ordered that the American, European-African-Middle Eastern, and Asiatic-Pacific campaign medals, including suitable appurtenances, be established, and that the said medals may be awarded, under such regulations as the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy may severally prescribe, to members of the land and naval forces of the United States, including the Women's Reserve of the United States Naval Reserve, and to members of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps who, during any period between December 7, 1941, inclusive, and a date six months subsequent to the termination of the present war, shall have served outside the continental limits of the United States in any of the respective areas as indicated by the names of the medals, such areas to be more precisely defined in the regulations hereby authorized.

        For the purposes of this order, the Territory of Alaska shall be considered as outside the continental limits of the United States.


        Editorial note: Executive Order 9265 was amended by the following provisions of Executive Order 9706 of Mar. 15, 1946, which appear at 11 FR 2811, 3 CFR, 1943-1948 Comp., p. 520:

      • 1. The European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal shall not be awarded for any service rendered subsequent to November 8, 1945.
      • 2. The American Campaign Medal and the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal shall not be awarded for any service rendered subsequent to March 2, 1946.
      • 3. Effective October 12, 1945, members and former members of the land and naval forces of the United States, including the Women's Reserve of the United States Naval Reserve, and former members of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, who served in the continental United States for an aggregate period of one year between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, inclusive, may be awarded the American Campaign Medal under such regulations as the Secretary of War and Secretary of the Navy may severally prescribe.
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